Father’s Day: My loss is gain

I lost my earthly father 25 years ago; it seems hard to believe it’s been so long. Devastating is the only word I have to describe my feelings at the time. My father was my world – nothing else could take his place in my life. But I know God took him in order to make way for himself because his death was what made me seek after God in the first place.

As always, his timing was perfect because while I was seeking, he brought another man into my life, the man who would later become my husband and the father of my children.

My loss paved the way for two more fathers: God himself and my husband Sam. So I consider my loss gain.

Father’s day is difficult for those of us who’ve lost our dads. But if you (like me at the time) haven’t yet met your Heavenly Father, I urge you to look up. Seek him. He is as real as the earthly father you’ve lost and is just waiting to meet you.

Psalm 50-11

Psalm 68:5 says: A father to the fatherless, a defender of widows, is God in his holy dwelling.

Finding and knowing him is as simple as talking to him in prayer. In the quiet of your heart and mind, all you have to do is ask. Here’s an example of prayer: Father, I want to know you and to have you in my life. I believe you are the one true God. That you sent your son to die on the cross for my sins and then raised him from the dead. Jesus, come into my heart and cleanse me. Guide me to my father in heaven and make me into your image that we may be one in spirit.

And if you’re blessed and will be celebrating your earthly father today, that prayer is for you as well. Two fathers are better than one!

Mother’s Day: One woman with a flower changes history

In two days, Americans will celebrate Mother’s Day, one of the most noted “female” holidays in the world. While walking through a local store I was astounded at the sheer number of greeting cards offered to shoppers.

A thought occurred to me – all these cards are filled with the words of other people writing sappy sentiments to someone else’s mom.

mother's day cards

Has our country become so lazy or illiterate that we can’t write our own heartfelt words?

Now, before you think I’m being snooty, I sent one of these cards to my own mom this year with my heartfelt words tacked on for good measure. I love her card; the artwork is beautiful and the writer managed to create a sentiment that expressed my heart exactly. Crazy!

The history of the American Mother’s Day is fascinating. It started with an idea by a woman named Anna Jarvis, and a simple white carnation worn as a badge by people visiting their mothers. The white carnation symbolizes purity and innocence.

spring-carnation-8101_1920

However, like many other holidays, Mother’s Day has been over-commercialized, something Anna Jarvis fought against for the rest of her life. She even petitioned the U.S. Government to remove the holiday from the calendar.

She’s probably rolling in her grave right now.

Even still, I have to admit I enjoy it. My children and husband usually concoct a wonderful breakfast in bed – gifts included. Then, they give me the best gift of all – a day to do anything I want!

One year I gave this “gift”of a day to my own mother and you know what she asked for? She asked that my brother and I accompany her to an opera in the park. I’d rather send a card any day! It was torture on us, but we did it because we love her and ultimately that’s what it’s all about.

On days like these, I’m sad that my mother and I live so far apart. I’d love to pin a carnation on, visit her in person and tell her how much she means to me.

I think this little poem by George Cooper says it best:

Hundreds of dew drops to greet the dawn,

Hundreds of bees in the purple clover,

Hundreds of butterflies on the lawn,

But only one mother the wide world over.

Your Turn: How will you celebrate Mother’s Day this year?